• Barbados In Review Vol 1

Barbados In Review Vol 1

by William Anderson Gittens

BARBADOS IN REVIEW VOL1 reflects the culture of Barbadians – the way we speak, the way we play, the way we eat, the way we worship, the way we live.  It is also captured  in 365 pages. He has basically sought to frame 50-plus years of Barbadian culture in a year of pages which tell the stories of Independence, heroes and habits of the past, and indeed a vision for the future of this young, developing nation which he loves.

Long Description

BARBADOS IN REVIEW VOL1 reflects the culture of Barbadians – the way we speak, the way we play, the way we eat, the way we worship, the way we live.  It is also captured  in 365 pages. He has basically sought to frame 50-plus years of Barbadian culture in a year of pages which tell the stories of Independence, heroes and habits of the past, and indeed a vision for the future of this young, developing nation which he loves.

BARBADOS IN REVIEW VOL1 chapters are noteworthy in name and content. The first, entitled Images of Yesteryear in Barbados, recalls the nostalgic images of our grandparents, parents, and indeed some of us, carrying buckets of water from the ubiquitous standpipe, and others walking for miles and amazingly balancing trays of food items and mauby containers on their heads. The childhood skills in hopscotch, marble cricket and making flysticks are matched in this book with the adult skill of sticklicking, while chattel houses and the old clothes iron come alive off the pages to inform younger readers and strangers to our customs.

For us more mature readers, Gittens calls to mind the unheralded skills of those who designed the donkey cart which has virtually disappeared, while reinforcing the presence of the indigenous tuk band and Mother Sally, and recalling vestiges of our colonial past through the windmills, including the still functioning one at Morgan Lewis.

With his penchant for detail, Gittens points to the controversial Nelson statue as a “landmark”, while giving exhaustive information on the tripartite agreement between labour, Government and the private sector called the Social Partnership, and showing the importance of the dissemination of information and record-keeping by featuring media houses past and present.

I admire Gittens’ work not just for its nostalgia and sentimentality, but he has not  omitted salient facts, such as the harsh reality of Barbados being a small and open economy, which is vulnerable to the shocks of external economies, particularly those of our main trading partners in North America and the United Kingdom.

On the lighter side –but still educational – there is a section with activities for children, followed several pages later by Gittens’ recollection of Wesley Hall Primary School’s historic cricket championship victories and the related importance of pursuing excellence, hard work, friendship and communication.
This work was obviously painstaking, bringing to light Barbadian sights, sounds and issues which might generally go unnoticed but which, in the eye of this photographer, artist and author, William Anderson Gittens, are rich in value to anyone who loves this country or is even visiting it for the first time.

It is ironic and iconic that Gittens has labelled our National Heroes, the last of whom was born in the 1930s, as the Builders Of Our Future. If most of them could today see the Barbados which they built, they would, like many of us, be proud of our achievements but ashamed of some of the practices which we have, due to our own cultural insecurity, borrowed from other cultures. However, we are a developing nation, so there is still much work to be done by the upcoming national heroes who will build the Barbados of tomorrow.

Product Details

Publisher: Devgro Media Arts Services
Publication Date: March 5, 2016
Binding: Paperback
Number of pages: 365
ISBN-13: 9789769373130
Weight: 1.75lbs

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Barbados In Review Vol 1

  • US$16.50


Tags: 9789769573130